Flipped Classrooms Cohort

Flipped Classrooms Cohort

Learn to flip your course, as part of a flipped cohort! Cohort participants meet face-to-face and also online, augmented by individual coaching sessions later in the semester. Participants work on redesigning their face-to-face course throughout the year.

[This cohort is FULL!]


Three face-to-face meetings this year will be in the School of Education building, Room 301:
      Monday, Aug. 25, 10:00-11:30am;
      Monday, Oct. 6, 10:00-11:30am;
      Friday, Feb. 20, 11:00am-12:30pm (make-up date Feb. 27).




FAQ

I would like to know more about the times for meeting over the semester. What is the time commitment?

Are we only able to flip one course. I have another online course that I teach in the summer and would like to flip that one as well...or at least begin the stages.

I tend to teach larger undergraduate classes and I am very interested in how to use the flipped course design in larger groups. Also, how would the grading work in a class format like this? Any research on effectiveness of this design?

Will the instruction be equally applicable to any discipline?

Who are our experts?

I am curious about instruction. Do we have to be at a set place at a set time throughout the semester? Is much of it online? How does it work?

With some experience in flipping instruction under my belt already, I'd be curious to know how differentiated the experiences in the program may be.

Could you send me a list of readings?


I would like to know more about the times for meeting over the semester. What is the time commitment?

Members of the cohort will meet in person three times during the mini-course: 1) In late August (to meet, bond, and immerse ourselves in the content); 2) in October to share your individual flipped plans with one another (to get feedback/ideas) and explore different methods of finding and creating flipped content; and 3) in February to share, celebrate, and extend our learning.

Additionally, I will hold two individual coaching sessions with each of you (first in September and second in November) to work with you individually on your plan for flipping at least part of one of your Spring 2015 courses. These sessions will be differentiated to fit your interests and needs and will be scheduled at a time that is convenient for both of us.

The other main component of the course involves online content. There will be two segments of asynchronous online content, both of which will include flipped content that you will interact with and a discussion board where course participants dialogue about the content. The first of these segements will take place in Septmeber and will focus on flipped instruction (e.g., research about flipped instruction, different models of flipped instruction, etc.). The second will take place in October and will focus on student-centered classroom pedagogy (e.g., collaborative group work, case-based instruction, inquiry, etc.).



Are we only able to flip one course. I have another online course that I teach in the summer and would like to flip that one as well...or at least begin the stages.

Choose one course to be the focal point of your work for this mini-course, but you can certainly be working to flip more than one course.



I tend to teach larger undergraduate classes and I am very interested in how to use the flipped course design in larger groups. Also, how would the grading work in a class format like this? Any research on effectiveness of this design?

Flipping can be effective in large, undergraduate courses. During the course, we can explore approaches to grading. Flipped instruction is a nascent field in research, and we will discuss the existing (limited) research on flipped instruction.



Will the instruction be equally applicable to any discipline?

We have a diverse group in the cohort, in terms of academic discipline and student audience (e.g., undergraduate and graduate students; lower-level and upper-level undergrads, courses for general audiences and courses for majors, etc.). I will work to make the course relevant to the teaching that each of you do. Be sure to speak up about your needs and the particularities of your situation.



Who are our experts?

I, Kim Kappler Hewitt, will facilitate the course, but I certainly don’t claim to be an expert. I am an assistant professor in the Departmeent of Educational Leadership and Cultural Foundations within the School of Education. I have been flipping for two years and have conducted modest research on flipped instruction (currently in press for the International Journal of Social Media and Interative Learning Environments). We will also draw upon the expertise of course participants and others who have experience flipping instruction. For example, you will watch a video interview of veteran flipper Dr. Kathleen Macfie from the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures.



I am curious about instruction. Do we have to be at a set place at a set time throughout the semester? Is much of it online? How does it work?

There are three components to the mini-course: 3 in-person meetings (scheduled using Doodle Poll); 2 coaching sessions (scheduled at your convenience); and 2 segments of asynchronous online content (done at your own time/pace). See below for a schematic that shows how these components work together in the course and when during the year you will engage with each.



With some experience in flipping instruction under my belt already, I'd be curious to know how differentiated the experiences in the program may be

Yes, the course will be differentiated to the degree possible to address participants’ interests and needs. Key aspects of differentiation include go-at-your-own pace online content and resources; individualized coaching sessions; and your own plan for flipping part or all of a spring course.



Could you send me a list of readings for use over the summer?

Here are some resources to check out:

Topic URL
Examples of Video Mini Lessons (from my statistics class) https://sites.google.com/a/uncg.edu/elcstats/video-mini-lessons-2
Sample VoiceThread http://voicethread.com/#u578.b161763.i863134
VoiceThread https://voicethread.com
Flipped instruction infographic http://www.knewton.com/flipped-classroom/
Link to book on flipped instruction http://shop.ascd.org/Default.aspx?TabID=55&ProductId=63037985&gclid=CIfy3c2CgLkCFYtDMgodKjoAMg
Flipped instruction background, research, and info http://cft.vanderbilt.edu/teaching-guides/teaching-activities/flipping-the-classroom/
Video on flipped instruction http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7_ejZ5OMIDE&list=PLB4C7262E8DBEF24D
Applets https://sites.google.com/a/uncg.edu/elcstats/applets
Go Animate sample http://goanimate.com/videos/0XeBNytAt4WY?utm_source=embed&uid=0FuyMODathlU
Go Animate http://goanimate.com/
Camtasia http://www.camtasiasoftware.com/camtasia/index-camtasia-us.htm
Blog from skeptic-turned-supporter of flipping http://www.middleweb.com/11419/confronting-flipped-classroom-bias/
VoiceThread info (how to use it; what it can do) http://voicethread4education.wikispaces.com
Article about flipped mastery in social studies http://smartblogs.com/education/2014/01/20/empowering-students-through-flipped-learning/
Flipped Learning Network http://flippedlearning.org/site/default.aspx?PageID=1