• Joanne Murphy
  • Joanne Murphy
  • CCI
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  • Assistant Professor
  • jmmurph2@uncg.edu
  • 1112 MHRA
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  • At UNCG Since: 2008
  • Undergraduate Research
    Fellow
  • Joanne Murphy
  • Undergraduate Research
    Fellow
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  • Faculty Groups: Undergraduate Research  
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  • Why Teaching?
  • The ancient classical world captured my imagination at a very young age. It seems in Irish mythology all our heroes go to Greece or encounters Greeks that teach them wisdom and about exotica! The more I learn about it, the more I love it. I want to try and pass some of this passion about something "other" to my students. I want them to get excited about a world that is far removed from theirs and yet extremely similar. The ancient Greeks and Roman provided so much that shape the modern experience that we can learn a lot from them about how to better interact with one another as world citizens. I get a great kick out of seeing my students realize the similarities and become enthralled by these cultures. At the same time that I am teaching the students about these cultures I also teaching them life skills of working in a peer-community, finding data, reading a text, analyzing it, and formulating and presenting their thoughts and opinions on it.
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  • Why Archaeology?
  • Why archaeology? A question my friends and family have asked many a time - at the beginning. Now they see me doing it and being excited by it (not to mentioned employed in it). I am fascinated that I can go into a field in Greece and find things sitting on the surface of the ground that were made 6000 years ago!!! The fact that I can tell a story about what happened in Greece that long ago thrills me. Currently I am working on two major projects: one on Bronze Age tombs around the famous Palace of Nestor in Pylos (southwestern Greece) and another on archeological surface survey on the island of Kea (Cyclades, Greece). Both of these projects give my students and me unique opportunities to recreate history. This is a real gift that we treasure.
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  • Why an FTLC Fellowship?
  • My research fuels my imagination, my freedom, my spirit of inquiry, and my teaching. It forces me to think critically and creatively and to solve a variety of problems. These are gifts that enhance all areas of my life and work that I would like to pass onto our students by incorporating more undergraduate research into our curriculum. When the FTLC called for application for an Undergraduate Research Fellow I was eager to apply. I want to see more students doing research. I want to explore how we can integrate more undergraduate research into our curriculum and introduce our students to it earlier in their academic experiences.
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  • What one thing would you change about UNCG?
  • I love working at UNCG. It has a great balance in the faculty of teaching, service, and research. I feel very supported here. The one thing that I would change is to bring more research opportunities to our undergraduates. Recent scholarship into undergraduate research shows two clear results: that there is a high correlation with both college and post-college success for students who have participated in and completed research projects at the undergraduate level; and that the humanities are falling behind the sciences in this area of undergraduate training. In order for us to offer successful undergraduate research experiences we need get more of our students doing research and doing it often and early.
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  • What’s Next?
  • Thanks to this FTLC Fellowship I will be able to work with the Undergraduate Research and Creativity Office to create models for how we can scaffold undergraduate research into the curriculum.
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